Loving Life

sixpenceee:

One of the greatest mysteries of the Himalayas is a small glacial lake named Roopkund. The lake is located in the Uttarakhand state of India, at an altitude of about 5,029 meters (16,499 feet). The area surrounding the lake is completely uninhabited and the water is a five day treacherous hike from civilization.

In 1942, Roopkund gained the name Skeleton Lake when over 500 human skulls, bones and artifacts were discovered surrounding and inside the ice. These human bones have baffled scientists for decades because historians don’t understand who these people were or what they were doing so high in the mountains.

In 2004, it was determined that the skulls contained severe head trauma. Based on this evidence it has been hypothesized that the people died from a sudden hailstorm. 

Probably the most remarkable discovery came after scientists conducted DNA tests on the bones, which proved to have a rich source of DNA material. The bodies were dated to AD 850. This date was 600 years earlier than initially reported.

Remarkably, the experts have found that the dead individuals belonged to two different teams. One team is marked by a shorter stature of the skeletons, while the other human bones are significantly taller. It remains unclear exactly who these people were.

SOURCE

CREEPY FACTS COMPILATION

joebowen:

Here’s a comic I did about how pigs are treated in factory farms. After I learned this, I swore off pork products forever, and today I’ve given up all meat. I’ll do more of these, because animal welfare has become incredibly important to me, and I feel I need to help increase awareness in any way I can.

joebowen:

Here’s a comic I did about how pigs are treated in factory farms. After I learned this, I swore off pork products forever, and today I’ve given up all meat. I’ll do more of these, because animal welfare has become incredibly important to me, and I feel I need to help increase awareness in any way I can.

obonic:

stories-yet-to-be-written:

EpicDash: 32 Surreal Places On Earth That Belong In A Dream, Part 2. 

Part 1 here

1: Turquoise Ice, Lake Baikal, Russia. Lake Baikal is the largest and oldest freshwater lake in the world. In the winter, the lake freezes, but the water is so clear that you can see 130 feet below the ice. In March, frost and sun cause cracks in the ice crust, which results in the turquoise ice shards we see at the surface.

2: Pamukkale Hot Springs, Turkey. Over millions of years, the hotsprings in Pamukkale have transformed the landscape. Although it may look like these terraces are made of ice and snow, Turkey has bikini weather all year round. The ground is just coated in white limestone.

3: Sentinels of the Arctic, Finland. These sentinels are actually giant trees covered in snow and ice. This strange sight occurs in winter, when temperatures range from -40 to -15 degrees centigrade.

4: Yuanyang County, China. The farming techniques in Yuanyang County have created a landscape which is truly amazing from the air. These rice fields are located on the slopes of Ailao Mountain, where the terraced levels help create flat surfaces along an uneven landscape.

5: Fly Geyser, Nevada, USA. Fly Geyser was accidentally created when a well was drilled and left uncapped. Minerals and algae started to rise from the geyser and accumulated to form an alien-like mound.

6: Grand Prismatic Hot Spring, Wyoming, USA. Grand Prismatic Hot Spring is the largest hot spring in the United States. The vivid colors in the spring are the result of pigmented bacteria, which grow around the edges of the mineral-rich water.

7: Underwater Waterfall, Mauritius Island. Strong ocean currents continually drive sand from the shores of Mauritius into the abyss below, creating this one-of-a-kind underwater waterfall.

8 & 9: Sea of Stars, Vaadhoo Island, Maldives. It may look normal during daylight, but at night, this beach comes to life. The sparkle in the water comes from marine microbes called phytoplankton. The galaxy they paint across the shore is nothing short of breathtaking.

10: Glowworm Caves, Waitomo, New Zealand. Thousands of tiny glowworms hang to the ceiling of this grotto and radiate a luminescent light, creating a scene straight out of a sci-fi movie.

Source

SO cool.

ooodle:

clangnbang:

wewewe-soexcited:

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.

The only creatures that are evolved enough to convey pure love are dogs and infants.

MY FEEEEEEELS

TOO FUCKING PRECIOUS

nelliescoffee:

wow-hate:

My Samoyed in the convertible lol

I’m so happy

edwardspoonhands:

pleatedjeans:

via

Yuuuup.
I love it how fifty year olds are like “BOTTLED WATER IS SO EVIL! It’s SUCH A WASTE OF PLASTIC!” However, if you place mountains of sugar that was acquired through industrial farming and some psychotropic compounds into the water and make it into liquid candy they’re like “THIS IS AN EXCELLENT USE OF PLASTIC AND YOU SHOULD POUR THIS STUFF INTO YOURSELF AND YOUR CHILDREN!”
There is definitely a fourth category here though…people realizing that things that their parents think are great and acceptable are in fact terrible (examples…coal…and homophobia.)

edwardspoonhands:

pleatedjeans:

via

Yuuuup.

I love it how fifty year olds are like “BOTTLED WATER IS SO EVIL! It’s SUCH A WASTE OF PLASTIC!” However, if you place mountains of sugar that was acquired through industrial farming and some psychotropic compounds into the water and make it into liquid candy they’re like “THIS IS AN EXCELLENT USE OF PLASTIC AND YOU SHOULD POUR THIS STUFF INTO YOURSELF AND YOUR CHILDREN!”

There is definitely a fourth category here though…people realizing that things that their parents think are great and acceptable are in fact terrible (examples…coal…and homophobia.)

majesticaljeff:

rednecktex:

huffy-lemon:

Favorite story posts part 1

That last one

My dad says the ‘making love in a canoe’ about american beer